Why Do 4 Berth Motorhome Only Have 2 Seat Belts?

Why Do 4 Berth Motorhome Only Have 2 Seat Belts
So, where are we now? – If you are using a motorhome manufactured between 01 April 1982 and 30 September 1988 that weighs up to 2540kgs MIRO (unladen weight), it must have seatbelts provided for the driver and the specified passenger. Any other belts should be three or two point secured belts.

It is important to ensure that these belts are fitted to the structure of the vehicle as the forces acting on them when in use are considerable. A motorhome manufactured after 01/10/1988 must have seat belts fitted for the driver and any forward facing passengers. Three point belts are required for the driver and the specified passenger – other front seat belts may be two point – providing that this passenger’s head could not strike the windscreen in the event of the vehicle being involved in a collision.

Optional seat belts fitted to the rear can be either three or two point secured belts and again should be fitted to the structure of the motorhome. Although not illegal in motorhomes manufactured before 1988, the police could consider it an offence to carry a passenger in a rear seat without a seat belt when travelling over 60mph as it would be deemed dangerous.

  1. Child seats or restraints can only be used with a three point seat belt system.
  2. Child car seats are governed by height of the child; children must normally use a child car seat until they are 12yrs of age, or until they reach 135cm (4ft 4 inches).
  3. It is important for the child’s safety to comply with the additional instructions for the use of such seat systems.

For more information on child car seat laws visit the Gov.Uk website here, Why Do 4 Berth Motorhome Only Have 2 Seat Belts

Can you travel in the back of a motorhome without seatbelts UK?

When are seatbelts required? – Whether your passengers have to wear seatbelts depends on where the passengers are sitting and whether there are seatbelts fitted. As the Camping and Caravanning Club explains, motorhomes first registered on or after 20th October 2007 must have seatbelts for designated travel seats, and where seatbelts are provided they must be worn.

  • You can be fined up to £500 if you don’t wear a seatbelt when you’re supposed to.
  • Travelling in a motorhome without a seatbelt where there are no available seatbelts is not specifically outlawed.
  • However, if you are stopped by the police and they believe that the seating arrangements for the number of passengers are inadequate and likely to endanger passengers or the stability of the vehicle, they have the power to prosecute you under the Road Traffic Act 1988.

Where a motorhome was registered before 20th October 2007 and travelling with a seatbelt is not possible, the club recommends that you:

only carry the number of passengers which the motorhome was designed to carry and ensure the vehicle is not overloaded, i.e. a two-berth motorhome with only the two cab belted seats should only ever carry two people; and check with your insurer at the outset if you intend to carry passengers where there are insufficient seatbelts available.

Children three years and under must be in a child car seat – if there is no seatbelt, they cannot travel. A child aged three years or older can travel in a back seat without a car seat and without a seatbelt if the vehicle does not have one, but this is not recommended.

Can you put extra seat belts in a motorhome UK?

Can you add seat belts to a motorhome in the UK? Yes. However, UK legislation states there are some rules and regulations you’ll have to follow. These relate to the age of motorhomes that are required to have seat belts, the number of seat belts you can add and the types of seat belts you can add.

Do you have to wear seatbelt in a motorhome UK?

Who needs to wear a seatbelt in your motorhome? – – If your motorhome was manufactured after 2006, you must identify the seats which you have designated as travel seats. Your motorhome must have seatbelts for all designated travel seats throughout the vehicle, and passengers are required to use them while the motorhome is in transit.

  • Only the driver and the specified passenger seats require three-point seatbelts.
  • The rest of the designated travel seats must have at least two point seatbelts.
  • Side facing seats cannot be designated as travel seats.
  • If your motorhome was manufactured after 1st October 1988, it must have seat belts fitted for the driver, as well as any forward-facing passengers.

These seatbelts must be worn when the motorhome is in transit. Seatbelts for the driver and designated passenger must be three-point belts. Other belts fitted in the vehicle are permitted to be two or three-point belts. – If your motorhome was manufactured before 1st October 1988, it must have seatbelts for the driver and a designated passenger in the front.

  • It is not necessarily illegal for a rear seat passenger not to wear a seatbelt.
  • However, the police could deem not wearing a seatbelt in the rear of the vehicle to be an offence if the motorhome is being driven at high speeds.
  • Although not illegal, the government does not recommend using side facing seats in the rear while a motorhome is in transit.

In the event of an accident, seatbelts might actually increase injury risk if there is a frontal collision. This is research which is cited by the EU Parliament. Ads by Salop Leisure Scroll to continue with content

Can you sit in the back of a motorhome without seatbelts?

None of us would dream of travelling in a car without using a seatbelt, but are we as familiar with the law when it comes to seatbelts and motorhomes? There tends to be some confusion about the legal requirements to use a seatbelt when travelling in a motorhome – in short, they are subject to the same laws as cars as, in the eyes of the law, motorhomes are considered to be a private vehicle.

There are no special exemptions for drivers and passengers in motorhomes, however there are some exemptions and conditions which apply to all private vehicle seatbelt laws. In this article, we will give you some more information on what you should (and should not!) do. It is understandable that there is some confusion relating to the use of seatbelts in motorhomes – did you know that, as recently as 2007, manufacturers did not fit seatbelts outside of the cab as standard? However, all seats are now fitted with seatbelts and it is a legal requirement for them to be worn.

There is good reason for this too; just think about what could happen should a motorhome be involved in an accident and flip onto its side. The only exemptions to the seatbelt regulations are as follows;

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A driver who is reversing and has removed their seatbelt temporarily

A passenger who is supervising a learner driver who is reversing

Drivers and passengers in an emergency services vehicle, such as an ambulance, fire engine or police car

A passenger who is investigating a fault in a trade vehicle

A delivery driver who will be travelling no further than 50 metres between stops

A licensed taxi driver who is either looking for hires or carrying passengers

A driver or passenger with a medical exemption. This person will need to obtain a Certificate of Exemption from Compulsory Seatbelt Wearing from their doctor. They must carry the certificate at all times while using a vehicle and must show it to the police if stopped. Motor insurers must also be notified of the exemption.

While older motorhomes, which were produced before the law was changed, are technically legal to use without passenger seatbelts, it is generally frowned upon and best avoided wherever possible (for safety reasons, as much as legal). If your vehicle does not have seatbelts, the following rules apply;

You must not carry children under 3 in the vehicle

Children older than 3 can be carried but must sit in the back

Bear in mind that these laws are only applicable where your vehicle was manufactured prior to the law being changed, for example, a pre-2007 motorhome or a classic car. When it comes to travelling in a vehicle which does not have seatbelts fitted to all seats, or where the seats are facing sideways, the official Department of Transport advice is: “Our advice is that passengers are safest in a forward or rearward facing seat equipped with a three-point seat belt.

Can extra seatbelts be added to a motorhome?

Can You Fit Extra Seatbelts in a Motorhome? – The answer to this is yes. It was perfectly legal for a manufacturer to produce a motorhome with no rear seat belts up to the year 2007. So if you are considering a pre-2007 motorhome don’t just expect there to be seatbelts.

Many manufacturers were putting rear seatbelts into their motorhomes way before 2007 so if you are considering buying a pre-2007 motorhome check out the number of seatbelts. Some motorhome manufacturers did not have actual seat belts but did put in the structure for putting a seatbelt in. There would be a point you can screw in the upper part of a three-point seat belt to.

This is really useful and is usually situated on the outer wall of the motorhome. The ones I have seen usually have a plastic plug fitted ready for a seatbelt bolt. Where this has not been done many motorhomes will have a lap belt fitted – not the best but better than nothing.

  1. Make sure you are happy with how they have been fitted.
  2. Ours were positively dangerous.
  3. There was a lap belt fitted to a piece of angle iron at the bottom of the seat.
  4. This would probably be enough to stop you flying about in a crash but the belt and attachments were not the problem.
  5. The actual seat is only made of a thin ply so if you were in a crash there is a good chance that the forces would pull you down, through the seat.

Not the best set up. So as well as the belts being attached strongly the seats also have to be strong to take some incredible forces exerted during a crash.

What is the law regarding seat belts in motorhomes?

There have been a number of changes to the laws relating to the fitting and using of seatbelts in motorhomes.

Seat belts have been fitted to the front seats of motorhomes since legislation first required them to be fitted and it is mandatory to wear them, In addition, motorhomes first registered on or after 20 October 2007 must have seat belts for forward and rearward facing seats. These seats must be designated as travelling seats and have a badge stating this. In a vehicle manufactured after this date, if a seat is not badged for travel you should not use it. Many motorhomes registered before that date have seat belts fitted, Wherever these are fitted, they should be worn; this has been mandatory since April 2006. EC Directive 2005/39/EC also states that travel in sideways-facing seats with a seat belt is unsafe and that from 20 October 2007, it will not be possible to travel in them in new motorhomes.

This legislation is not retrospective so vehicles registered before 20 October 2007 do not have to have seat belts fitted in the rear. Please see the Direct.gov website for more seat belt information.

Can you walk around in a motorhome while driving?

There are many perks to traveling in an RV, since it offers all of the comforts of home in a convenient mobile setup that you can take almost anywhere. Once you arrive at your next campsite, all you need to do is park, make sure the camper is level, and hook up to your campsite’s power and water.

Although your motorhome is equipped with a bathroom, kitchen, and sleeping areas, how much can you use your RV’s amenities while it’s on the move? In general, is it legal to be inside an RV camper while while it’s moving? It’s illegal to sleep, walk around or even be inside an RV like a travel trailer, fifth wheel or any kind of pull-behind campers while it’s moving.

However, you can sit inside a Class A, B, and C motorhome that has seat belts, and you can legally use some of the facilities inside while driving. This article will cover what you can and cannot do inside your RV while it’s moving down the road. Why Do 4 Berth Motorhome Only Have 2 Seat Belts @nomoresticksandbricks

Do passengers in a motorhome have to wear seat belts?

If your motorhome was built after 2006 Identify the designated travel seats – each of these must have a seatbelt, and passengers must wear the seatbelt while the vehicle is moving.

Can you sleep in a motorhome while driving UK?

Can you sleep in a motorhome on the street? – It’s difficult to give a yes or no answer to this question, with it varying depending on which county of the UK you’re in. But, other than the Caravan Sites & Control of Development Act – and more recent legislation covering gypsies and travellers – there is no specific law which makes it illegal to sleep in a motorhome at the roadside.

  • That’s not to say you won’t be woken with a knock on the door from the police, however, with local authorities taking ownership of highways (this includes lay-bys).
  • So, if they want to move you on, you have little choice but to search out a new spot, as you have no ‘right’ to park any vehicle on the road.
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That said, you’re unlikely to run into any issues with parking up your motorhome on the roadside to get some kip provided that the vehicle is not causing an obstruction, you’re not disturbing anyone, and you’re not in the same spot for more than a day or two.

You could find it trickier going if you plan on bedding down in a public car park, operated by a local authority, which are usually covered by Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) which prohibit sleeping, camping and cooking. The TRO may also have a clause that specifies the maximum vehicle weight, classes of vehicle and so on that are permitted to use the car park.

Your best bet is to read any signage carefully and play it safe if you’re unsure.

Can you sleep in a motorhome on the street?

Living in a camper van, for many people, has become a popular choice in recent years. As these likes of Wi-Fi and internet connectivity has become available across the UK, as well as the ability to work remotely, this has meant that travellers can create livelihoods for themselves and work while on the road.

  • Exploring even the wildest and remote places in the UK has enabled people who live in campervans to escape their busy lives and create new, meaningful experiences.
  • Campervans have become especially popular as alternative accommodation capable of more flexible living.
  • There are regulations and laws around living and sleeping in a campervan, which will impact how you use it.

In our breakdown, we explore everything from the laws on roadside parking, finding overnight stop-over points, the laws on sleeping in your campervan, and some tips and tricks to help you along the way. Key Laws You Should Know Under current UK law, a motorhome, campervan or a similar vehicle is often defined the same as a caravan.

Section 29 (1) of the Caravan Sites and Control of Development Act 1960 defines a caravan as: ‘Any structure designed or adapted for human habitation which is capable of being moved from one place to another (whether being towed, or by being transported on a motor vehicle or trailer)’. This means many of the laws for caravans apply to these other vehicles, including campervans.

It’s worth making sure that you are aware of this law when reading car park signs or similar. For example, if you were on a campsite and you have permission to stay in your campervan overnight, then this is legal. However, this becomes trickier if you’re parked on the side of a road, or in a layby for a night and considering sleeping in your campervan. Why Do 4 Berth Motorhome Only Have 2 Seat Belts Parking Laws for Campervan Owners When it comes to motorhome and campervan travellers, the law is understood to mean that you cannot camp on land in England and Wales, because land is largely private. To ‘camp’ in these situations means to park overnight, or for a period of no more than 21-28 days consecutively.

  1. This is slightly different in Scotland and Northern Ireland, however, where you cannot camp without the permission of the landowner.
  2. Typically, when it comes to roads and lay-bys, the landowner is normally the local authority.
  3. There is a lot of confusion on parking laws and when it’s appropriate to stay overnight in your campervan.

The difference between being parked legally and illegally often depends on how (and where) you are parked. For example, it errs on the side of caution to not park in areas that are either busy or experience high volumes of traffic. Similarly, if there is no specific local bylaw or traffic regulation order stopping you from overnight parking or sleeping in your campervan, it’s still advisable to be cautious.

How many passengers can ride in a motorhome?

5th Wheel Trailers and Travel Trailers – So far, we’ve talked a lot about how many people can ride in RVs. What about towable trailers like a 5th wheel or a travel trailer? In most states, it is not legal to have people riding in a towable trailer. There are a few exceptions to this, but the consensus is that you should not do this for a variety of safety reasons.

  1. Class A, B, and C RVs are very different from towable trailers.
  2. In an RV, the living space of the RV connects to the cab space of the vehicle where the driver is.
  3. This is not the case for towable trailers, and it creates some safety concerns.
  4. For towable trailers, the number of people you can bring with you is the number of people who can safely fit inside the towing vehicle.

Generally speaking, if you are towing with a truck, you will have a seating capacity of 5 to 6 people. If you are towing with an SUV, you will have a seating capacity of 5-8 people. To learn more about the different types of RVs, check out our post, 7 Types of RVs You Simply Must Know.

Can you drink alcohol in a campervan UK?

The law is clear in the UK, don’t drink and drive. However, while drink driving is clearly unacceptable there is a difficulty for motorhome owners. Part of the reason motorhomes are so popular is because of their flexibility. They’re both a vehicle and living accommodation all wrapped up in one tidy package.

How many people can travel in a motorhome UK?

General requirements – Although it is not specifically illegal to travel in the accommodation area of a campervan, you should bear in mind that this area would not have been specifically designed for use when travelling and Regulation 100 of the Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986 (SI 1986 No.1078) may apply. This requires:

a motor vehicle, and all its parts and accessories; the number of passengers carried, and the manner in which any passengers are carried in or on a vehicle; and the weight, distribution, packing and adjustment of the load of a vehicle

to be at all times such that no danger is caused, or is likely to be caused, to any person in or on a vehicle or on a road. Further to this, Section 40a of The Road Traffic Act 1988 (as amended by Section 8 of the Road Traffic Act 1991) Part II, Using a Vehicle in a Dangerous Condition, states that: A person is guilty of an offence if he uses, or causes or permits another to use, a motor vehicle or trailer on a road when:

the condition of the motor vehicle or trailer, or of its accessories or equipment; or the purpose for which it is used; or the number of passengers carried by it, or the manner in which they are carried; or the weight, position or distribution of its load, or the manner in which it is secured;

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is such that the use of the motor vehicle or trailer involves a danger of injury to any person. Our advice is that passengers are safest in a forward or rearward facing seat equipped with a three-point seat belt. Seat belt anchorage points should be designed so that they will be capable of withstanding the high forces of an impact and seat belts must comply with the latest British or European standards and be marked accordingly with either the ‘e’, ‘E’ or BS ‘Kitemark’.

We strongly recommend that they are professionally installed by qualified persons (such as a commercial garage or seatbelt specialist). Although side facing seats, with or without seat belts, are not illegal, we would not advise that they are used. This is because seat belts are not designed to be used with such seats.

In the event of an accident, seat belts on these side facing seats may help to prevent the wearer being thrown around the vehicle or from being ejected, but in a frontal crash they can increase injury risk by subjecting vulnerable parts of the body to higher loads than seat belts used on forward facing seats.

If you intend to carry children aged 12 years or under, the seat belt wearing regulations require them to use a suitable child restraint. You should bear in mind that child restraints cannot be fitted to side facing seats. In order to fit the required child restraints, you would need to have forward or rearward facing seats with full three-point seat belts.

Whilst there is no specific legal limit to the number of passengers carried, the manufacturer will probably specify the maximum number that the vehicle is designed for and if that is exceeded, Regulation 100 of the Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986 or Section 40a of The Road Traffic Act 1991 may again apply.

Is it illegal to sit in the back of a van UK?

Can I carry goods and passengers in the rear? – Although there is nothing specific in the regulations to prevent you doing this, we would strongly advise against carrying heavy goods and passengers in the rear of a van unless the load is secured to the bodywork to ensure it does not move about.

  1. Alternatively, if you intend to carry passengers on a regular basis you can create a separate load area by installing an internal partition.
  2. If a partition is fitted you should ensure it is strong enough to stop the load from being thrown about inside the van.
  3. Securing the load or fitting an internal partition offers some protection to any passengers being carried, which is particularly important in the event of an accident, as heavy, unrestrained items being thrown about are likely to cause death or serious injury.

If the vehicle has more than 8 seats in addition to the driver, it will be classed as a minibus or bus, whether or not it also has room for the carriage of goods.

Is it illegal to sit in the back of a van UK?

Can I carry goods and passengers in the rear? – Although there is nothing specific in the regulations to prevent you doing this, we would strongly advise against carrying heavy goods and passengers in the rear of a van unless the load is secured to the bodywork to ensure it does not move about.

Alternatively, if you intend to carry passengers on a regular basis you can create a separate load area by installing an internal partition. If a partition is fitted you should ensure it is strong enough to stop the load from being thrown about inside the van. Securing the load or fitting an internal partition offers some protection to any passengers being carried, which is particularly important in the event of an accident, as heavy, unrestrained items being thrown about are likely to cause death or serious injury.

If the vehicle has more than 8 seats in addition to the driver, it will be classed as a minibus or bus, whether or not it also has room for the carriage of goods.

Can passengers ride in motorhome?

Class A, Class B and Class C motorhomes offer passengers the ability to sit in the back while the vehicle is in motion. This is because these types of motorhomes are equipped to withstand driving accidents.

Can you move around in a motorhome while driving UK?

Can you legally live in a motorhome? – This question is much easier to answer. Yes, you absolutely can live full-time in a motorhome, if that’s what you want to do. There are no laws stopping you from doing so – you must just ensure that your vehicle has passed its MOT and is fully road legal.

  1. While it’s perfectly legal to live in a motorhome, however, it’s definitely not for everybody.
  2. There are lots of great blogs out there run by people who have quit their job and sold their house in exchange for a life on the road, which can be as tough as it is exciting.
  3. If you’re thinking about making a life for yourself on the road, it’s wise to read some blogger accounts of what it’s like before making the big move.

It’s also worthwhile weighing up the cost of living in a motorhome including motorhome insurance and park fees.

How many passengers can ride in a motorhome?

5th Wheel Trailers and Travel Trailers – So far, we’ve talked a lot about how many people can ride in RVs. What about towable trailers like a 5th wheel or a travel trailer? In most states, it is not legal to have people riding in a towable trailer. There are a few exceptions to this, but the consensus is that you should not do this for a variety of safety reasons.

  • Class A, B, and C RVs are very different from towable trailers.
  • In an RV, the living space of the RV connects to the cab space of the vehicle where the driver is.
  • This is not the case for towable trailers, and it creates some safety concerns.
  • For towable trailers, the number of people you can bring with you is the number of people who can safely fit inside the towing vehicle.

Generally speaking, if you are towing with a truck, you will have a seating capacity of 5 to 6 people. If you are towing with an SUV, you will have a seating capacity of 5-8 people. To learn more about the different types of RVs, check out our post, 7 Types of RVs You Simply Must Know.